Gave Agent Carter and Agents of SHIELD another shot…

They’re okay I guess. Got caught up to where they are currently, so I suppose they held me well enough to achieve that?

Assorted not particularly organized thoughts follow.

Spoilers, I guess.

  • I feel like, while the character of Carter herself is great, I have issues with the depiction of sexism in the show. It’s all very overt, very 1940s, very “haha those wacky people in the past, good thing we don’t have anything like that now.”
  • I really dislike the ending. “I know my worth, so I don’t need to complain about blatantly unfair treatment, not like those feminists.”
  • I did like the interrogation scene where she called out how childish the men were being, especially because she included Enver Gjokaj’s character in that for putting her on a pedestal and then acting betrayed when she was revealed to be imperfect.
  • Also: Enver Gjokaj is the fucking best.
  • I want a season of Agents of SHIELD to have the climax be resolved by Coulson weepily pleading with another character over a radio.
  • Speaking of, I don’t know why they seem to keep trying to push Coulson as the main character, when it’s really obvious that’s Skye.
  • It was pretty obvious from early in the first season that Skye was going to turn out to have a superpower she didn’t know about, but right up until the reveal I thought that power was going to be something like “subconsciously causes people to want to protect her” or “uncanny charisma.” Because seriously, that’s her superpower.
  • It’s interesting watching with very little knowledge of the comics, so I have no idea which characters or references I’m supposed to get excited about. I did not, for example, know what Inhumans are.
  • The Inhuman/fish oil thing is a pretty clever way to have people spontaneously developing superpowers around the world when they’re not allowed to say “mutants” or “X-Men.”
  • Weren’t the Kree working with Thanos in GotG? That seems like a thing that could be significant later on.
  • One meaning of maveth is indeed death by violence, with implications of judgment; however, the more common meaning is simply death as a human universal, or death as a state of being or destination. That last is most interesting, as it would be associated with Early Judaism’s primary conception of the afterlife, Sheol, a gray and desolate place where the shades of the dead linger. The place Simmons ended up doesn’t sound too different, does it?
  • Joey mentioning his boyfriend startled me, not because it’s startling that he has a boyfriend, but because it took until 2015 to have an openly gay character in the MCU. Unless there’s a gay character in Daredevil I don’t know about, I guess.
  • There’s a potentially interesting solution in both shows to the core problem of the superhero genre, namely that the notion of a singular individual or small group of individuals with vast power to protect the rest of us and little to no accountability is fundamentally antithetical to the values the heroes supposedly uphold. Carter rankles at the lack of equality and information-sharing within the SSR, just as Coulson tries to make SHIELD less internally secretive and operate with more trust, which is to say both are pushing against authoritarian structures of power-through-information-control, but at the same time the organizations for which they work exist to conceal information from the general public, arrogating to themselves the right to decide what outsiders are or are not “ready” for. It’s not a good solution diegetically, but extradiegetically it produces some interesting conflicts worth exploring.

3 thoughts on “Gave Agent Carter and Agents of SHIELD another shot…

  1. The Kree were the people that the people Thanos was trying to wipe out had a peace treaty with. Blue Guy was a Kree but the Kree state disclaimed responsibility for Blue Guy’s actions, on the not unreasonable grounds that he was working for Thanos and not for them.

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